About Me

My Photo
Great Falls, Montana, United States
I love creating art. I love the Creator! And through that love, I find a little slice of heaven on earth and I give Him all the glory! It's a great adventure and I'm excited to see what's around the bend! Come join me, won't you?
Showing posts with label aqua bond. Show all posts
Showing posts with label aqua bond. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Carribean DREAMS Fiber Scarf FINISHED!

To see the beginning of the "Caribbean Dreams" scarf, click here

After washing out of the Aqua Bond and Aqua Film topping products; the scarf has air dried, and then lightly misted with water and pressed slightly using a pressing cloth.
Before closing the gaps in the scarf
So... it has a few big gaps where I didn't quite get the threads joined to the other triangle.  Is this a problem?  Absolutely not!  Personally, I LIKE it.  ALOT! And I wouldn't hesitate to wear it just like this!  BUT... for those people who are a little more 'perfectionist' oriented... or concerned about the gaps... (you know who you are!) ...posted below is the technique I used to close those gaps -- just for you!  So tell me what you think of the "before shot" (above) or the 'after shot" (below)!  I'd love to hear your thoughts.
I used my favorite Glitter thread in silver, as I had also put a bit of it in the scarf sandwich to begin with.  And then... by the way... do ya'll know out there that a Bernina machine can 'sew on air?'  Oh so true!
Like a dream, sister!
Stitching free motion to join the triangular areas, and close in the gaps
Foot:  free motion #29. Thread is placed in a vertical position so it releases from the side of the spool.  VIP tip. Tension is lowered to 1.0.  Needle down is engaged. Zig zag stitch, free motion is set up.  Tension: lower to 1.0 and for convenience's sake... use your needle down feature.
 

LOVE using a zig zag stitch free motion!  And my bobbin thread?  Bottom Line from  Superior Threads, of course!



A few other views posted below to hopefully inspire you to your own distinct creations that are just ready to burst forth and bloom within your creative minds!

 Some of you KNOW what I say in class:  It's the pursuit of EXCELLENCE... not perfection!
 It's so simple... I only used two different cotton threads; one in pinky mango, and the other in turquoise blues, draped on lime green, turquoise YLI candlelight threads... those thick ones.   Added a bit of white shiny yarn, twisted off some silver Glitter thread, and trimmed the outer edges with a beautiful hand-dyed rayon ribbon! Perfection!  I mean, EXCELLENT! 
 Elegant or casual.  Gorgeous, light and airy and it GLOWS with sparkly goodness and beautiful STYLE!  Perfect for a wedding or any other occasion you may be attending!
  And so here is the way the 'joining' as I call it, looks on the finished scarf.
"gaps" are now joined
I laid out the full scarf on the table so you can see the complete pattern, color and style.  What a FUN, and oh-so-unique and original scarf you can make!  This one is FOR SALE. Click here to go to my Etsy shop.
To make YOUR OWN, sign up for the 
CLASS:  Saturday, May 7th, 
10-1pm at the Bernina Silver Thimble! 

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Ribbon and Thread Scarf: Part 1!

These are the supplies I began with to make my latest scarf.  You will need Aqua Bond; a water-soluble paper sticky back stabilizer.  And Aqua Film topping.  And lots of pretty threads, ribbons, yarns, lace... fabric strips and cordings can all be draped, laid on, and mixed up. 505 Spray comes in handy to secure the threads, before you lay on the Aqua Film in the last step.  See some students in the last class here!

The Aqua Bond package has been opened, and cut in half, lengthwise on a 36" length, and the ends joined together.  (Sorry - I forgot to take a picture of that!) So here's how it looks after I''ve applied my threads and covered it with the aqua film - another water-soluble stabilizer. This piece is now ready for the free motion fun to begin!  You can see the pink swirly circles I've begun in the triangular shape.
And more quilting... around and around we go... a great way to begin - to get free -- with free motion!  I'm teaching a spring-time "Beyond Free Motion" class beginning May 5th at Bernina Silver Thimble; 5:30-8:30 pm. It's a three-week class, held on Thursday evenings.  
 I will share lots of hints, tips, samplers, special free motion quilting embellishments and "free motion applique" for y'all to explore with me! A mini trunk show, educational materials and lecture on threads, needles, tension are also on the agenda! CMON and HAVE FUN with the FREEDOM of FREE MOTION!


I've finished my pink and green triangles.  Now moving on to the blue triangles, with blue thread.  I'll have a post for you on what happens using the YLI thread...

Check the backside of the scarf, to see where you might need to add more quilting... making sure those circles all join and co-join, like a web, to form a surface that is entirely linked, one with the another... whether it be fiber, cord, thread or ribbon... join them with lots and lots... lots and lots... of circles!  And then there's a bit of an 'ooops' I want to share with you, but it'll have to wait for another post. More to learn and show you how I fixed this baby up!

HINT:  Set your machine speed to 1/2 speed or 3/4 speed, and put 'your pedal to the metal' and keep your movement of the scarf fabric at an even pace.

And then WASH, WASH and WASH the glue of the stabilizers out!  Use lukewarm water... and gently swirl, squish, and rinse.  You can let it soak for 20 minutes or so... and then make sure you refresh your water, and go after it again... and several more times, until you no longer feel the slick surface of the glue on your fibers.  Let it air-dry.  Press it flat if needed, using a low to medium heat on iron, and using a pressing cloth... just in case!  (Ask me how I know this one!)  But look at the beautiful yarns that made this "Santa Fe" scarf!  I love how this turned out... and it's made mostly with just the yarn... more on it at class!

WEAR... and enJOY.  No one... no one... will have one just like yours, I guarantee you!  Look at the all-white scarf... with silver and gold metallic threads.  Beautiful!  Great for summer-time wearing, and just as fabulous at the Holidays.
 I've made over 100 of these over the last couple years.  Let me tell you that they will take approximately 3-4 hours from start to finish.  A 'quick' project, really.  If you want to add beads to the edges... expect that to take you another hour ... or two, depending on your skills with the needle and beading.  I share some tips and hints about my beading technique at the class, too.
 I sell mine at GALLERY 16 here in Great Falls.  They retail there for $95.00.  The materials alone will cost you close to $20.00 or more, depending on what you have on hand. I'm TEACHING THIS CLASS on MAY 7th, 2011 - 10:00 am to 1:00 pm a SATURDAY at BERNINA SILVER THIMBLE here in GREAT FALLS!  It's a super fun class!  JOIN US!  I will share all my best hints and tips with directions and a hand-out.  You can get one made before Mother's Day even!  OR graduation gifts?  Or just because... it's a very cool and fun thing to make for you!

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

The "Isaiah" Scaves

I was asked by a good friend of mine, to add a bible verse to some scarves she had purchased for our Big Sky Tres Dias Prayer Team. "Tres Dias" is Spanish, meaning three days, and it is a weekend dedicated to help us grow, explore and mature our faith in Jesus Christ --- to learn more, & be strengthened in living our Christian life. Visit the website "Big Sky Tres Dias" for more information, or contact me. I so enjoy the sweet fellowship of seeing old friends, and meeting new ones every time I serve these weekends.  Here is the verse for our Women's weekend retreat:
So, truthfully, I was a bit intimidated by the sheerness and fragility of the fabrics in these scarves. I knew two things: some sort of stabilization was needed, and I wanted to write the verse out by employing free motion.  
The best stabilizer for this job was "Aqua Bond" -- a sticky-backed, water-soluble stabilizer.  I cut it into 1 1/2 inch strips, peeled off the paper backing, and placed it on the backside of the scarf, at the top edge. I chose my #24 free motion foot to help prevent excess fabric from 'flagging' which means the fabric travels up the needle in an unpleasant fashion. The #9 foot would have worked well here too.
For thread, I chose a Superior Threads, tri-lobal polyester.  I had to loosen my top tension greatly --- to .5!  I put a black Isacord polyester in the bobbin. I found out that if I kept my stitches too small, they easily could make a hole in the scarf... not cool. I wish I had tried a 50 weight thread for the bottom... but I didn't until I was finished! Sew .. it.. goes!
 It was definitely a great benefit to use my 'white gloves' (quilting gloves), to help grip the thin fabric, making it as taut as possible, and especially working with just the top edge, too.  I did think about a hoop... but I would have had to move it alot, and I think it would have damaged the fragile fabric, too.  After I finished stitching, I washed out the stabilizer, and pressed them. I was fairly pleased with the way they turned out. I got to try something new, and was blessed to be asked, and to learn... more. 

 Isaiah 12:2:  Surely God is my salvation: I will trust and will not be afraid, for the Lord God is my strength and my might, He has become my salvation.
 Praying He is YOUR strength and might...and if He is not... that He will be! Amen.

Monday, April 4, 2011

Saturday's FIBER SCARF Class at Bernina Silver Thimble

We had a fun Saturday class, making more SCARVES... All you need is Aqua Bond, Aqua film topping, some fun yarns, threads, fibers... and a free motion quilting foot.  See more about the products and some of the scarves I've made in an earlier post here.
  We had lots of fun exploring color options, design styles and placement ideas.  This is a GREAT project to get to know your machine; it was Penny's first time free motioning on her new Bernina 380. She used YLI Variations polyester 35 weight thread in the top and bottom of her machine... and she used the bright orange variegated.  It was so GORGEOUS on her scarf!
Penny's thread, ribbon and yarn selections...so far!
 Penny and  Joan both were very gracious to allow me to photograph them and their beautiful creations!  Thank you so much ladies!  It was a a fun class, and a pleasure to have you!
Penny putting her new free motion skills to use on her scarf!
Joan chose to use YENMET metallic thread for the quilting on her scarf; she wound it BOTH the bottom and top, and loosened her top tension considerably.  It fed through her machine like clockwork!  She has a 30 year old Bernina!  It is STILL a workhorse!
Joan has her scarf under the machine and adds her free motion stitching!

Colorful and FUN selection for Joan's scarf

Monday, January 24, 2011

LACE Flowers

I call them "Lace Flowers" but perhaps someone has a better...more creative or original name?  I'd LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU!!!!  (pretty please!?)  Hey... anyone out there???  Hmmm... well as I wait with  baited breath, let me tell you a bit about these little jewels of threadplay....

Quite simple to do... and make them as fun as you'd like with variegated and solid polyesters, rayons, or cotton threads.  Start with:
  • 90/14 topstitch needles, or a microtex needle
  • bobbin wound with the same thread as your top thread (I love the Bernina 830 with the JUMBO bobbin which holds 40% more thread... add that with the Bottom Line polyester thread, adding an additional 40% more on a bobbin... and you are REALLY SET UP NICELY!!!! Yahoo!
  • a free motion foot; for this technique, I love my #9 closed toe, smaller metal foot, as it allows me to get closer to the wooden hoop edges
  • wooden hoop 8" or 9" that will fit conveniently underneath your foot
  • tulle netting
  • pattern
  • water soluble sticky back stabilizer
  • water soluble clear film for topping
Here's my hand-drawn flower traced onto the sticky backed stabilizer (Aqua Mesh Plus with a sticky back)... (you could use Aqua Bond as well... whatever you choose; it's sandwiched with a layer of white tulle and the Aqua Film topping which was ever so slight sprayed with temporary adhesive to make it easier to hoop it all.  I also used a sharpie marker in black, but any color will work, just use a fine tip.

No you don't have to draw flowers... How about a hankerchief? Will post pictures of the one I made in another blog entry... or how about lace edging on a collar?  I've done some on jean jackets... but this would be great for dragonfly wings... and lots of other designs...
 Anyone have any other ideas?  And YES... this is the technique I use for "Jamie's Angel"  wings and lace edging on her dress... see that post here.

You can see here that I have loaded a black thread; my choice is KING TUT 40 weight in solid BLACK, with a bobbin-weight black polyester on the bobbin... I like the King Tut for it's heavier presence with outlining the flower.  My favorite foot... #9 closed toe, a smaller free motion foot makes it easy to work around a hoop. Drop your feed dogs, GO!  I trace around each line TWICE.... for extra boldness and presence...


Don't forget to llllllooooooowwwwwerrrrr your top tension!  Lower it at least 1-2 settings.





These are the threads I used to make the flower shown... all of them tri-lobal polyesters from Superior Threads --- "Rainbows" in variegated colors... Preetttttyyyyyyy!!!


Just go in circles... small, big, overlapping, and filling in until it pleases you!   Go slow to medium speed, or your threads may frazzzle... as well as you?! 

I like to trace a bunch of them in varying sizes on a large piece of stabilizer fabric and free motion them together, which also makes it easier to hoop them, and getting them all done at once, means you have less thread changes and you also don't waste as much material product...

IF you'd like my pattern.... comment and I'll send one to you!!!!


Just another shot... some of the black details get covered up by the surface colored threads... but no problem!  I will go over them again when I attach them to my quilting surface, to give the flower dimension, and to attach it in a "no see" way!  That post coming another day!


Here's a picture of another flower, which was done in blue variegated tri-lobal polyester threads...


There will be a white 'laced edging' I've added to the outside petals, which was done in a 40 weight white rayon (Sulky) thread, with white Bottom Line polyester thread on the bobbin!  Love it!






And here are a couple pics of the finished lace flowers, trimmed of excess tulle, after washing out all the stabilizer product...

I hope you'll tell me what you think...?  What other creative ideas does it prompt you to contemplate?!!  Hmmm?

I'd love to hear from you!


EnJOY!

Sunday, January 23, 2011

FABULOUS FIBER SCARF

Oh gosh...I really hope you will want to try this project, if you haven't already!!  These scarves are not only beautiful, and one-of-a-kind, but functional, AND a great way for anyone who is new to free motion, to get the 'feel' of stitching without alot of other distracting issues such as tension.  And one gets to play with texture, color, and 'found items' such as laces, ribbons, threads, cording, and more. I have made well over a 100 of these! Currently they are for sale at Gallery 16 in Great Falls.  You can expect the supplies to cost you around $25.00, give or take.  When I add that cost, it means I charge a minimum of $75.00.   The "Fiber-Art Scarf" class I teach is popular for a good reason.  We hope to have at least several of these classes scheduled at the BERNINA SILVER THIMBLE in Great Falls, in March, April and May!  Stay tuned, or email me for further details. 

Easy and fun; the hardest part is in knowing when to stop!  Classes are popular prior to Christmas and then again for Mother's Day and Easter, but this is an easy project for any occasion... easily FINISHED in less than 3-4 hours!  *note: hand beading will take you an extra 1-2 hours depending on how handy you are with beads and a needle! 

The items in the first picture below are the basic stabilizers & supplies  you need to get started:
  • 505 temporary adhesive spray
  • Aqua Film topping
  • Aqua Bond water soluble adhesive stabilizer
  • Polyester thread is recommended for strength and durability, but you can use cottons and metallics as well
  • Aqua Bond is available at the shop at Quilting Arts or ask your local quilt shop or machine dealer to get it in stock for you.
  • 90/14 microtex, topstitch needle
  • free motion foot of your choice
  • ribbons, lace, cording, yarns, bits and pieces of fabric (batiks are great because they don't fray as much
  • Set your machine up for free motion by lowering your feed dogs, and inserting a FRESH  90/14 microtex or topstitch needle.
  • LOWER your top tension as needed
  •  Expect to use two new needles... don't hesitate to change it if you start having thread breakage. This project is hard on needles as those thicker fibers will dull the tip rather quickly.  Remember... you're going through stabilizer, glue, and thick yarns, ribbons, etc... don't be stingy with that needle... it's not worth it!
  • roll up the scarf as you are 'quilting' it, to make it easier to handle (see pics below)
  • don't forget to check your stitching from the back... just in case you really have serious tension issues!  And sometimes it's easier to look at the back to see where you may have missed some stitching, due to the reflection and shiny surface stabilizer on the top...
  • be sure to 'intertwine' all the stitches, making big and small circles all over the scarf surface, making sure they overlap each other.  You can choose circles, or you can choose straight lines... or a bit of both!  Be sure to catch the edges of the scarf in the stitching so that everything is JOINED together.
How about laying a bit of Razzle Dazzle thread in with the ribbons and yarns... fabulous sparkle, and it adds that 'crisp' factor I adore... but choose and play with anything that strikes your fancy!

Don't hesitate to throw on some of those metallic threads, and I do mean "throw!"  They can be quite dazzling, and easy to sew over as they are just trapped in between the two stabilizers... try it by just unravelling the thread from the cone on the top of your yarns and threads before laying on the top aqua film topping... letting them fall where they may! 
HINT: Be sure to wind the bobbin with the same thread that you have in your top, as both sides of the scarf will show!

"Santa Fe" Hand-dyed yarns
Luscious hand-dyed yarns make up this scarf in it's entirety... with the exception of adding a bit of silver Razzle Dazzle in with the gorgeous southwest colors!  Simplicity... AND... what a blank slate to add a few creative 'thread buttons' with silver metallic thread!!!
Beads... these are attached by hand, and you can expect the beading to take you at least an hour, unless you are an experienced beader.  I can do one in less than an hour, but in the beginning, it took me about two hours to complete both ends of the scarf with beading.  They are optional... your scarf will be quite beautiful without them too!

I use only beading thread for it's  strength, and a long, slim, beading needle is the absolute perfect TOOL for attaching beads.
 Silver metallic thread buttons... I love adding them!
Don't think you need to do only straight lines... making lines wavy... angular, and 'plaid-like' is terrific fun!

I've used chenille, rayon ribbons, wool yarns, and synthetic laces... just keep in mind that sometimes the "fuzzier" fibers (like wool) have a tendency to attract the glue, and that makes it much harder to wash out.
Be sure to soak your scarf in lukewarm water for at least 20 minutes or even overnight, but before leaving it to soak, rinse the glue that starts to fall away, so that it doesn't reattach to the fibers while the scarf sits in the water.... and rinse, rinse, and RINSE... making sure all that  glue is completely washed out!  You could also sing the song "I'm gonna wash that man glue right out of my hair - scarf!"  See the pictures of the scarves the girls made in the scarf class... my blog entry on here: DECEMBER 7, 2010


Roll up the ends as you work... and don't forget you can turn the scarf over and work from the 'plain paper' side, which really helps visibility, and to see where you may need to place stitches... and there is no light reflecting from the topping, so it sometimes makes it easier to see!
 I like to secure the ends with 4-5 rows of straight stitching, to give strength and a bit of stability so beads can be secured at the scarf ends if desired. This is the picture to the right.

The beads on the blue/green scarf below were "looped" and secured in between the loops.  You can also choose to just "dangle" them, in single fringes... and use a small bead as a knot at the end, and bring your thread and needle back up through the row of beads, to continue adding each line of beaded fringe.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...